Course Catalog

  • The following is a general list of course offerings. Course offerings are subject to change each semester/year. Students should check with counselors at the time of course scheduling for an updated list. A course may be cancelled if a minimum number of students have not requested the course or if an instructor is not available.

    ACT Preparation

    This is an enrichment class to teach techniques to enhance test-taking skills in preparation for ACT/SAT tests. The course includes an overview of test structure and test-taking strategies; review of English grammar, sentence structure, punctuation; review of vocabulary and context clues; review of Pre-Algebra, Algebra I and II, Geometry, and Trigonometry skills; and practice tests in each area.  Suggested for seniors and juniors who have taken the ACT at least one time.

    Advanced Band

    This is a performing group (audition required) for students who have achieved reasonable proficiency. This course includes theory, sight-reading, scales, and technique development. The students will be required to participate in many before and after school rehearsals and performances. Students must pay uniform and/or instrument rental fee.

    Advanced Composition – H

    A course in writing with an emphasis on developing technique through the study, analysis, and imitation of selected models; the ex positive and persuasive models; the documented essay; and the literary analysis essay.

    Advanced Math

    An intensive course in areas of advanced mathematics that include the study of algebraic systems, vectors, concept of functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, complex numbers, use of logical inference, development of the axiom of completeness, study of sequence and series, and application of vector concepts in geometric proof.  Other supplemental activities, such as ACT preparation, are expected of the students.

    Advanced Nutrition & Food

    Students will learn about the preparation of party foods, “home cooking,” special diets, regional foods; current research and trends in meals and preparation; use of the microwave oven. 1/2 credit.  Prerequisite – Food & Nutrition 1/2 credit.

    Advanced Placement American Government

    This course serves as an introduction to the United States national government. Students will examine and analyze our basic government institutions and processes. Students will be required to participate in the “We The People” mock congressional hearings and competitions. This program requires students to work in groups, complete independent research, and engage in public speaking. Also, students will be required to participate in the national simulation – TEMC.

    Advanced Placement English Language and Composition

    A college-level course developed through literary analysis of selected works involving extensive reading and writing at the college level.  Students will sit for the AP exam in May.

    Algebra I, Part I

    An entry-level course that introduces students to algebraic concepts as they apply to the real world. Students will learn these concepts using a hands on, concrete approach. Students investigate, through application, the operations and properties of rational numbers, ratio, proportional reasoning, estimation, exponents and radicals, the rectangular coordinate system, sets and logic, formulas, and solutions of first degree equations and inequalities.

    Algebra I, Part II

    A continuation of Algebra I, Part I. Students study in greater depth the properties of the real number system and operations, evaluating rational algebraic expressions, solving and graphing first-degree equations, and using real-world problems to apply theory. Students will learn these concepts using a hands-on approach.  Students will sit for the state End of Course Test.

    Algebra I

    A study of elementary algebra that includes performing the four basic operations on directed numbers and developing the basic language skills needed for other areas of mathematics.  Prerequisite – Transitions to Math, or placement based on Leap scores.  Students sit for End of Course Test.

    Algebra I – Honors

    In addition to the Algebra I curriculum, Honors Algebra I requires the students to present at least two class presentations and participate in at least one competition. Other supplemental activities, such as ACT/SAT preparation, are expected of the students. Students sit for End of Course Test.

    Algebra II

    An extension of the language and equation solving skills developed in Algebra I, including the development of trigonometric skills. Other supplemental activities, such as ACT preparation, are expected of the students. Prerequisite – Algebra I.  Students are scheduled in Math Essentials for first semester instruction.

    Algebra II – Honors

    In addition to the Algebra II curriculum, Honors Algebra II requires the students to present at least two class presentations and participate in at least one competition. Other supplemental activities, such as ACT/SAT preparation, are expected of the students.

    American History

    American History is a general survey course concentrating on the years 1877 to the present. The aim of the course is to give students a sampling of the people, events, and ideas that have contributed to the growth of our nation. Students sit for the End of Course Test.

    American History – Honors

    The curriculum for the honors program follows along with the description for the regular course. In addition to the general survey of the regular course, students must satisfactorily complete specific assignments in order to receive honors credit. Students in honors classes are required to complete an in-depth historical investigation research paper, and  make oral presentations on a social studies topic. Students will sit for the End of Course Test.

    Art I

    Art I is a course designed to heighten and expand a student’s creative ability. The course offers students the basics of design and introduces them to drawing, painting, printmaking, lettering, and three-dimensional projects.

    Art II

    Art II is a course designed for more in-depth exploration of area (i.e. painting, drawing, media) offered in Art I, plus figure drawing.

    Art III/IV

    Art III and IV are courses designed for student independent study to focus on building a portfolio for possible college admissions to an art program.

    Beginning Band

    This course is a first-year study of a band instrument. No previous playing experience is required. Instruments taught include flute, oboe, clarinet, baritone, saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, bass, and drums.  Band members participate in concerts, parades and football games.

    Biology

    Study of living systems, including ecology, cell biology, energy pathways, and diversity among organisms, physiological processes, psycho biology, reproduction, processes of mutation and natural selection.  Students sit for End of Course Test.

    Biology – Honors

    In addition to the biology curriculum, honors biology requires students’ participation in specific laboratory investigations and one student-initiated, researched, performed and completed investigator project which leads to participation in the school and regional science competitions.  Students sit for End of Course Test.

    Business Computer Applications I

    This course is designed to help prepare students for the business world by developing the skills required to use word processing and spreadsheet software packages. Students earn MOS certifications which may be used as JumpStart diploma credentials.

    Carpentry I

    This course serves as an introduction to shop safety, hand machine woodworking tools. It requires various small projects involving design, layout, construction, and finishing. Students may earn NCCER Core certification, which may be used as a JumpStart Diploma credential.

    Carpentry II

    A continuation of Carpentry I.  Course follows NCCER curriculum and leads to certification in Carpentry I and Carpentry II for qualifying students.

    Chemistry

    This course will cover the topics of measurement, scientific notation, dimensional analysis, chemical nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, atomic structure, quantum theory, gas laws, the periodic table, and introductory organic chemistry.  Other supplemental activities, such as ACT preparation, are expected of the students.

    Chemistry – Honors

    This course is designed for students who are superior in science and mathematics. The course will cover the topics listed above in a more in depth fashion. In addition, students will be required to complete an a science fair project involving an investigation designed by the student, which exhibits his/her mastery of the scientific method.  Other supplemental activities, such as ACT preparation, are expected of the students.

    Civics

    This course covers the local, state, and federal make-up of government. This area of study prepares students to become thoughtful participants in our multicultural society. The curriculum emphasizes the foundations of American citizenship, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, citizenship, legislative process, landmark Supreme Court cases, civil and criminal law, the free enterprise system, and international relations.  Students will sit for a practice citizenship exam.

    Civics – Honors

    This is a one-semester course that includes the study of federal, state, and local governments (legislative, executive, and judicial branches), election procedures, and analysis of current events. The curriculum emphasizes the foundations of American citizenship, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, citizenship, legislative process, landmark Supreme Court cases, civil and criminal law, the free enterprise system, and international relations. Students in honors classes are required to  write a research paper and make one oral presentation on an approved social studies topic.

    Computer/Technology Applications

    Computer Applications is an in-depth study of application programs that provide students with tools to assist in cross-curricular problem-solving projects (such as A+ Certification). Students will select and integrate appropriate productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, desktop publishing, presentation graphics, telecommunications, and draw and paint programs. Students will deliver the product electronically in a variety of media, such as, printed copy, monitor display, Internet documents, and video. Note: Students cannot earn credit in both Computer Applications and Business Computer Applications.

    Computer/Technology

    Computer/Technology is a one-semester entry-level survey course introducing students to technology career options; personal/professional productivity software applications; multimedia productions; Internet exploration and web page design; and programming. Ethical considerations in technology usage-piracy, copyright, and filtering-will be discussed. Through the study and hands-on use of technology applications, students will learn to make informed decisions about technologies and their applications. By using technology as a tool that supports the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the appropriate technology source for the task; use search strategies and technology to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information.

    Computer Science I

    Computer Science I is a full-year elective course designed for students interested in studying the structure and power of programming languages. Emphasis will be placed on the development of algorithms and logical solution structure including the use of visual organizers in the design process. A prevailing computer language will be used to code problem solutions. A brief overview of the development, design and functionality of a computer will be included.

    Computer Science II

    An independent study course in advanced computer science.

    Cooperative Marketing Education I (DE Program)

    Supervised on-the-job training with emphasis on continued personal development, small business operation and entrepreneurship; brings information to prepare students for post-secondary studies and careers in marketing; provides DECA membership and activities. Students schedule three (3) other courses during each semester.

    Cooperative Office Education (COE Program)

    C.O.E. is a work/study class that encompasses career academics and workplace performance. Students attend school in the morning and in the afternoon and are employed with a cooperative business in the local community that mirrors their career interests.

    Desktop Publishing

    Concepts of layout and design will be studied and explored. Students will use logical steps when integrating text and graphics (original and scanned) to create papers, reports, newsletters, brochures, and other professional-looking documents. Effective communication techniques will be used when producing these documents. Students will identify, compare, and use various desktop publishing technologies and determine appropriateness to the task or audience. Terms related to topography and principles of page design will be studied. Software will be evaluated for appropriateness. The learning environment will extend beyond the classroom through creation and sharing of electronically formatted and published document vial electronic networks. A variety of strategies will be used to create effective designs. Students will develop portfolios of work produced for assessment purposes.  Students prepare the school yearbook.

    English I

    Study skills, writing, proofreading and editing; oral composition, vocabulary, and types of literature; information resources; an introduction to the elements of specific literary genres (short story, non-fiction, poetry, mythology, drama, and the novel); LEAP/GEE 21 preparation.

    English I – Honors

    In addition to the English I curriculum, honors English I requires thinking critically, reading entire literary works as contrasted to excerpts of literature, reading assigned literary works during the summer, writing weekly compositions and quarterly book reports, participating in fairs and other parish-endorsed competitions, and vocabulary study and ACT standardized test preparation.

    English II

    Study skills, writing, proofreading and editing, oral communication, vocabulary, information resources, and types of literature; a continued study of the elements of specific literary genres.  Students sit for the End of Course Test,

    English II – Honors

    In addition to the English II curriculum, honors English II requires thinking critically, reading entire literary works as contrasted to excerpts of literature, reading assigned literary works during the summer, writing weekly compositions and quarterly book reports, participating in parish-endorsed competitions, and vocabulary study and ACT standardized test preparation. Students sit for the End of Course Test.

    English III

    Writing, proofreading and editing, oral composition, vocabulary, and a study of American literature from its beginning to the present; the research paper. Students sit for the End of Course Test.

    English III – Honors

    In addition to the English III curriculum, honors English III requires thinking critically, reading entire literary works as contrasted to excerpts of literature, reading assigned literary works during the summer, writing weekly compositions, vocabulary study and ACT standardized test preparation.  Students will be exposed to lessons that build skills for the IB program in English and will be scheduled for AP English Language and Composition. Students sit for the End of Course test

    English IV

    Writing, proofreading and editing, oral composition, vocabulary, and a survey of British literature from its beginning to the present; the research paper. Students prepare for the ACT test.

    English IV – IB

    IB English IV is the first session of the IB English HL curriculum.  The course requires thinking critically, reading entire literary works as contrasted to excerpts of literature, reading assigned literary works during the summer, writing weekly compositions, oral presentations, in depth literary analysis and ACT standardized test preparation. Students are required to submit the IB Written Investigation to proceed to the next IB course.

    Environmental Science

    Study of the principles and processes of general ecology, including human ecology; an in-depth approach to examining the environment using physiochemical parameters, including resources and energy in the environment, and pollution and health of the environment. Students prepare for the ACT test.

    ESOL I

    Developmental listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences and exercises are integrated with the thematic material being addressed across the three courses for beginning students. The video instructional program offers natural language in natural settings that add cultural information as well as language and concept development. The textbook offers additional reading and writing exercises (individual/small group tutoring in mainstream subjects as needed).

    ESOL II

    Developmental listening, speaking, reading, and writing experiences and activities are selected from the content of school courses. American history is stressed so that while English is being acquired, concept and cognitive growth is taking place (individual/small group tutoring in mainstream subjects as needed).

    ESOL III

    Reinforcement of literary genres. Appropriate simplified classics provide the literature for reading, discussing, and writing activities. Emphasis is on process writing and the teaching of discrete grammar rules through these writings

    Financial Math

    This course provides a format for individual students to move from mathematical concepts to concrete applications in real life contexts and to learn to make mathematically sound decisions in their roles as consumers, employees, business persons, community leaders, and/or entrepreneurs. Course topics include, but are not limited to, insurance, banking, personal/financial planning, and analysis of financial management tools.  JumpStart Diploma course.

    Fine Arts Survey

    Fine Arts Survey is a survey course covering music, dance, art, and theater. This course is a hands-on introduction to the visual and performing arts. Students gain exposure to the arts and are expected to participate in each facet of the course. This course is offered to juniors and seniors, and is a requirement for TOPS.

    French I

    French I is a beginning course with an emphasis on learning to speak and understand spoken French. Every day vocabulary and expressions are introduced. Grammar needed for basic communication is presented with an emphasis on asking and answering questions in French. A major feature of the course is the video cassette program which accompanies each lesson in the text. By the end of the year, students should be able to speak, understand, write and read French at a beginning level.  Students should have completed English I, before scheduling this course.

    French I – Honors

    This course includes everything in the description for French I above. In addition, students are required to do a nine weeks project. The nature of the project varies each nine weeks. Some examples of projects include oral presentations and written assignments about francophone culture, written and oral original skits, and story-writing in French.  Students may participate in the state foreign language competition.

    French II

    French II is a continuation of French I. While speaking and listening comprehension are still important and are developed in French II, longer and more varied reading selections and dialogs are presented. Writing takes more importance in French II as students begin to write about various topics at greater length in French. By the end of the year, students should be able to speak, understand, write and read French at an advanced beginner’s level.

    French II – Honors

    This course includes everything in the description for French II above. In addition, students are required to do a nine weeks project. The nature of the project varies each nine weeks. Some examples of projects include writing and/or presenting booklets, stories, games, original skits and brochures in French. Students may participate in the state foreign language competition.

    French III – IB

    This course concentrates on refinement of language and vocabulary studied in French I and French II. Students learn more specialized vocabulary, most verb tenses, and important grammar needed for effective communication. Students are able to understand lengthier spoken and written passages. Students also write dialogs, letters, essays, short stories, poems, and skits of a considerable length. Most of class time is spent using the language as a medium for talking and writing about various topics, such as French-speaking culture; short stories, poetry, literary excerpts, newspaper articles, music, art, history and culture. A project is required each nine weeks.

    IB French Language B (French IV)

    This is a continuation of the IB language program. French IV students continue to refine all language and vocabulary studied in levels I through III while learning more advanced grammar and vocabulary. Each unit of the course focuses on a time period of French culture, history, civilization, and literature. Students will participate in oral and written IB examination and may participate in state competition.

    Freshmen Focus

    This course addresses the transitional needs of students entering high school and provides a foundation for continued success during high school. It focuses on academic competencies, career development, students’ personal/social needs, and the transition from school to career.

    General Music

    This course is a study of the basic fundamentals of music theory. It includes music history, music appreciation, sight-reading, ear training, and some singing.

    General Technology Education

    This is an introductory course to assist students in career exploration. This course includes introduction to drafting, basic wood technology, computer technology, internet, electricity, tool identification, fuses, safety, house wiring, house construction and design. Students will explore various curriculum topics through hands-on activities, videos, technical books and handouts, discussions, outside presenters, and the completion a School-to-Career Student Research Portfolio.  Students may earn the NCCER Core certification.

    Geometry

    A study of Euclidean Geometry.  Students sit for the End of Course Test.

    Geometry – Honors

    In addition to the geometry curriculum, honors geometry requires the students to present at least two class presentations and participate in at least one competition. Other supplemental activities, such as ACT/SAT preparation, are expected of the students.  Students sit for the End of Course Test.

    Gifted Resource (non credit)

    In order to comply with IEP requirements, all students identified as Gifted may attend Gifted Resource during their lunch time. Teachers for the Gifted Department are available for tutoring or to assist students who wish to explore a topic of their choice.

    Health Education

    A comprehensive health education course that focuses on the eleven components of health and how healthful or risk behavior in one component may affect other components. The course includes understanding the human body, mental health, family and social health, growth and development, nutrition, exercise and fitness, drugs, diseases and disorders, consumer and personal health, safety and first aid, CPR, and community and environmental health.

    Health Science I

    This course is a survey of anatomy and hospital careers. Participants also work two (2) blood drives, attend job shadowing, listen to guest speakers, and complete a portfolio.

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    Intermediate Band

    This is an instrument study course for students who have had at least one year’s experience playing an instrument, but lack proficiency for advanced band. This course requires many after school rehearsals and performances. Students must pay uniform and/or instrument rental fee.

    Introduction to Forensics

    This course is designed to provide students with information on the various fields of forensic science so that it may help them make a career choice or add to their present knowledge. Topics covered in the course include the role of the lab, scientific evidence in court, forensic psychiatry, criminalistics, forensic pathology, forensic toxicology, blood stain pattern interpretation, entomology, serology and DNA typing, forensic odontology, and forensic anthropology. The field of forensics offers a new and rewarding challenge to students by allowing them to apply the latest in laser and computer technology to help solve crimes. Note: Due to the graphic nature of the material studied, a letter of parental permission must be on file. Prerequisite: Biology (with a C or better, unweighted); Chemistry (with a C or better, unweighted, or currently enrolled)

    Law Studies

    This course provides a practical understanding of law and the legal system that will be of use to students in their everyday lives. It will improve comprehension of the fundamental principles and values underlying our Constitution, laws and legal system. Awareness of current issues, cases and controversies relating to law and the legal system will be of focus. A greater sense of justice, tolerance, and fairness will be promoted. An opportunity to consider and clarify attitudes toward the role that law, lawyers, law enforcement officers, and the legal system play in our society will be provided. Participation in case studies, trial procedure, effective use of precedents, and mock trial participation will be available.

    Nutrition and Food

    Students will learn the basic principles of nutrition, table setting, food preparation, use of equipment, and recipes. 1/2 credit paired with Advanced Food and Nutrition.

    Physical Education I

    A beginning course in physical education offering a variety of required activities including health education, team and individual sports

    Physical Education II

    A second year course in physical education offering a variety of required activities including health education, team and individual sports.

    Physics

    Physics is a study of motion and energy. First semester covers mechanics and the second semester covers types of energy. Should be taken by college bound students, especially those interested in science or science related career. Students will participate in instruction on ACT – Science preparation.

    IB Physics I  Honors

    The topics covered will be the same as the regular physics curriculum. This course will require more math applications than regular physics. It should be taken by college bound students who have been successful in other honor math and science courses. Especially for those students interested in science or science-related majors that require college physics such as Engineering.

    ProStart I

    Students learn food service/culinary arts industry skills in the classroom and in food service operations in this first year of the two-year program. This is the beginning of four semesters of coursework in strategic business management, customer skill training, food preparation, and workforce readiness. In addition, students complete paid internships in a variety of industry settings. Upon completion of this course, students take the first of two parts of a national test for certification by the National Restaurant Association. Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition; Advanced Foods and Nutrition

    ProStart II

    Students develop food service/culinary arts industry skills in the areas of strategic business management, customer skill training, food preparation, and workforce readiness. Paid internships continue through this second year of the two-year program and the second of the two-part national test is administered to eligible students. Upon completion of this course, students are eligible to receive a nationally recognized certification from the National Restaurant Association as a required credential for the JumpStart Diploma.

    Psychology

    This course is a basic introduction to psychology with emphasis on the development of personality, theories of personalities, growth and maturation, psychological disorders and treatments. The main goal is to develop in the student the ability to examine personal behavior and thinking more objectively, thus gaining greater self-knowledge which can be used to help the individual to reach his or her maximum potential. Some of the activities include learning how to interpret dreams, making and interpreting our own inkblot tests, sampling personality inventories, intelligence tests, and viewing many fascinating films and documentaries.  Students will be prepared for the CLEB – college test.

    Reading I, II, III, IV – Reading 180

    This course offers intensive instruction for the student who is reading below grade level and needs improvement in vocabulary, literal and inferential comprehension, interpretive and appreciative skills, critical and creative thinking, reading efficiency, and functional reading skills.

    Reading/Novels for Young Adults

    This is a course stressing critical thinking skills, intended for those students reading on or above grade level. Reading excellent literature using the shared inquiry method and whole group reading, students will learn to give full consideration of to the ideas of others. Students will have opportunities to develop an appreciation for all types of literature and a true love for reading.

    Spanish I

    Spanish I is a beginning course which includes memorization of vocabulary words, learning and applying grammar rules, oral reading, repetition and responding. Other activities include written responses to audio and video tapes, translation and the study of Hispanic culture. Course evaluation includes homework, pop quizzes, cumulative tests and exams. Students should have successfully completed English I before scheduling foreign language.

    Spanish I – Honors

    This course includes everything in the description for Spanish 1 above, but additional work is required, such as a project due each nine weeks, reports, and memorization and presentation of dialogues. Students may participate in State Foreign Language Festival.

    Spanish II

    Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I. This course approaches Spanish with a “whole language” method. Through the reading of age-appropriate literature, students learn vocabulary, grammar, writing and speaking. Stories and dialogues are read in class; translations of the same are generally assigned for homework. Story line is reviewed orally and in writing. Grammar structures and vocabulary are studied separately. Tests on literature include true/false items, short answer, translation and dictation. Tests on grammar include question and answer, fill in the blank, translation, and written answers to oral questions.

    Spanish II – Honors

    Spanish III IB

    This course is a continuation of Spanish II. The course follows the same basic format as Spanish II, but the literature is a little more difficult. More verb tenses are included. Students are required to write original short stories. A project is due each nine weeks. Students may participate in State Foreign Language Festival.

    Spanish Language B (IB Spanish IV)

    Spanish IV is  continuation of Spanish III, but Spanish IV students have a more advanced text and work more independently. Spanish IV students continue to refine all grammatical constructions learned in Spanish I, II, and III while learning more advanced grammar and vocabulary. Each unit of the course focuses on a time period of Hispanic culture, history, civilization and literature. Students will participate in oral and written IB examinations.

    Speech I

    This is an introduction to verbal and non-verbal communication. The course includes a study of voice and body as tools of communication, an introduction to public speaking, an introduction to theater, parliamentary procedure, discussion, debate, and media. The course will focus on writing, considering the speech writer’s audience and use of words.  Students will present in written and oral forms.

    World Geography

    World Geography is a one-Carnegie unit course that fulfills one of three social studies units required for high school graduation. In this course, students develop a spatial understanding of the Earth’s surface and the processes that shape it, the connections between people and places, and the relationship between man and his environment. It stresses national and state benchmarks evaluated on LEAP 21. Students in regular classes may be required to do projects periodically.

    World Geography – Honors

    In addition to the requirements of the regular geography curriculum, students in honors classes may be required to do at least one book report each nine weeks, participate in competitive activities, write a research paper, complete a physical display, make one oral presentation on a social studies topic, and participate in the social studies fairs.

    World History

    While historical events are unique, they are often driven by similar and repeated forces. In telling the history of our world, this course pays special attention to specific and recurring themes such as cultural, science and technology, religious and ethical systems, interaction with the environment, empire building, etc. These themes are presented to show that from America, to Africa, to Asia, people are more alike than they realize. Throughout history humans have confronted similar obstacles, have struggled to achieve similar goals, and continually have striven to better themselves and the world around them.

    World History – IB

    World History is designed to enhance the ability of college bound students to perform effectively in advanced work. Students will follow the IB curriculum for History of the Americas.